Oxford AASC: Photo Essay

Sign up for Emails

Sign up now to receive an email alert for the Focus On feature!

GO

Privacy Policy

Previous Features

PHOTO ESSAY

Dictionary of Caribbean and Afro-Latin American Biography

Back Arrow Previous

Photo 9 of 11

Next Next Arrow
Albert Huie

Albert Huie (1920–2010). Self-Portrait. (Wikiart.org/ Fair Use © Albert Huie)

Dubbed the "father of Jamaican painting," Albert Huie was one of Jamaica's first professional artists and one of the island's most successful and popular painters. DCALAB author Claudia Hucke notes that Huie was strongly influenced by anti-colonial movements, especially cultural nationalism" "Along the lines of cultural nationalism, Huie was one of the first Jamaica artists to include black subjects as key characters in his paintings. Up until then, portraits had been mainly reserved for the white elite of the island." Over the course of his career, Huie's interests included portraits (especially of black subjects), nudes (with special attention to the variety of skin tones among black subjects), landscapes, and genre pieces featuring scenes from working-class life. Some of his most famous works include The Vendor (which can be seen on Jamaican postage stamps), The Counting Lesson (exhibited at the 1939 World's Fair in New York), and Miss Mahogany (which was controversial due to its depiction of a beauty pageant contestant in the nude). Huie was trained in Jamaica, Canada, and England and lived and worked in the U.S., Canada, and Jamaica..

Back Arrow Previous

Photo 9 of 11

Next Next Arrow