Oxford AASC: Photo Essay

Sign up for Emails

Sign up now to receive an email alert for the Focus On feature!

GO

Privacy Policy

Previous Features

PHOTO ESSAY

Dred Scott v. Sandford

Back Arrow Previous

Photo 8 of 8

Next Next Arrow
Front page of Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, published 27 June 1857.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

The Scotts' fight for emancipation lasted from 1846 until 1857—eleven long years. Ultimately the Scotts were freed. Mrs. Emerson remarried into a family that opposed slavery. Shortly after the Supreme Court handed down its decision her new husband sold the Scott family to Taylor Blow, the son of Dred Scott's original owner, who immediately freed them. Dred Scott died a year later. Slavery was not outlawed in the United States until 1865 with the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment. The Fourteenth Amendment states, "All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the state wherein they reside." This amendment was passed in 1868 to directly supersede the Dred Scott v. Sandford decision.

Back Arrow Previous

Photo 8 of 8

Next Next Arrow