Oxford AASC: Photo Essay

Sign up for Emails

Sign up now to receive an email alert for the Focus On feature!

GO

Privacy Policy

Previous Features

PHOTO ESSAY

African Americans and Washington DC

Back Arrow Previous

Photo 1 of 13

Next Next Arrow
Anna Julia Cooper sign

Road memorializing Anna Julia Cooper. Deborah Willis/AASC

Washington's memorials include tributes to educator, clubwoman, writer, and leader Anna Julia Cooper (1853–1964). Anna Julia Cooper Way is located in Northwest D. C. in LeDroit Park, on the circle of her home located at 201 T Street. In her autobiography, A Voice from the South, Cooper wrote that black women were a strong political and social force and could serve as spokespersons for their race. Cooper co-founded the Colored Women’s League in 1892, and attended the World’s Congress of Representative Women, held in Chicago in 1893 during the Columbian World’s Fair. There, she spoke during a session called "The Intellectual Progress of Colored Women of the United States Since Emancipation.” In 1900, Cooper attended the first Pan-African Conference. She was the first and only woman to be elected to the American Negro Academy, and later was one of the founders of the Colored Women’s YWCA and the Colored YMCA. In 1925, Cooper earned her Ph.D. and became the fourth African American woman to receive a doctorate. Her dissertation title was "The Attitude of France toward Slavery in the Revolution.”

Back Arrow Previous

Photo 1 of 13

Next Next Arrow